Impact of Pupil Premium Funding 2015-2016

Impact of Spending of Pupil Premium 2015-16

  • In the 2015/16 academic year, North Fawdon Primary School received £140,220 in Pupil Premium Funding
  • 75% of our children are Pupil Premium which equates to 115 of the 154 children from Reception to Year 6 currently on roll (we have received funding this year for 106 children)
  • 45.2% of our Pupil Premium children are girls and 55.6% boys
  • 52.1% of our Pupil Premium children also have Special Educational Needs (SEN).
  • There are 69 pupils in school who have SEN and 60 of those (91.9%) are also pupil premium.
  • 63.6% of our English as an Additional Language (EAL) children are also eligible for the Pupil Premium (14 out of 22 children)
  • Many of our initiatives are whole-school focused as we have such a high proportion of Pupil Premium children. Staff scrutinise data regularly and where Pupil Premium children are not closing the gap, new interventions and actions will be put into place
  • All staff are aware of who Pupil Premium children are and they are highlighted on action plans appropriately
  • With the introduction of universal infant free school meals, school staff have been proactive in making sure that all qualifying families have signed up for free school meals where possible
  • Pupil Premium pupils will be referred to throughout this report as disadvantaged.

The funding was used to overcome the many different barriers our children experience:

  • Successful Easter and Summer schools have been delivered which ensured no regression over the holiday and kept learning alive so that children were well prepared for the new term.         All disadvantaged children who attended the Easter and Summer schools made ARE in Year 6.
  • Visits and experiences have been planned to specifically enrich children’s experiences and this has given children valuable learning experiences which have then been used in the classroom to develop understanding.
  • Funding to release Special Educational Needs Coordinator (SENCO) to work with specifically families of SEN children who are disadvantaged two afternoons per week has helped support families and pupils to make progress socially, emotionally and academically.
  • Extending the school day to ensure optimum learning and offer all extra-curricular clubs free of charge has made a significant impact to the achievement of our disadvantaged children who attend them.
  • Exposing children to culturally rich experiences has inspired children and enabled them to make connections in their learning.
  • Specifically targeting disadvantaged children with extra support in their learning has had a significant impact on achievement.
  • Support families to meet their children’s needs has meant that no doctors or CYPS appointments have been missed this year.
  • Maximise every opportunity to support parents to read with their children has meant a significant increase in disadvantaged pupils achieving ARE (Age Related Expectations) across the school.
  • Funding a School Counsellor has enabled some of our most vulnerable disadvantaged children remain on track academically and to make progress socially and emotionally.

 

Action

Cost

Impact

Keep the learning alive throughout the holidays

  • Summer school (5 days) and Easter school (3 days) for current Year 6 class to keep the learning alive over the holidays.

£2150

  • Summer school kept learning alive over the summer holidays and limited any regression. This meant that they could start fresh in September ready for new learning. The Easter school also kept the momentum of learning going at a crucial period in the school year. This has contributed to the progress and success in Year 6.
  • All of the disadvantaged who attended the Easter and Summer schools achieved ARE in Year 6.
  • The exception was one pupil who enrolled in our school in February 2016 having been out of the UK for the past three years and not speaking English. He did however, attend Easter School and although he did not make ARE in writing, Reading and Spelling Punctuation and Grammar (SPAG), he did make ARE in maths.

 

Mirror effective practice in school in the home environment

  • Funding to release SENCO to work with specifically families of SEN children who are disadvantaged two afternoons per week.

£9500

  • SENCO has worked with Thrive for three children in Year 2 and a pupil in Year 4. The assessment supported Educational Psychology reports and EHCP advice.
  • SENCO has worked with two families in nursery and has done home visits and reports for both of them to gain funding.
  • The table below details the work of the SENCO and her involvement with two different families in detail.

 

What was done

Impact

Pupil A (male,

Lower KS2

SEN register)

  • A Lead Professional has been in place since September
  • SENCO attended an appointment at RVI Dr Eyre- referral for CYPS agreed but for social and emotional help.
  • Met with CYPS Dr Sigalas
  • Social Services referral made- liaised with first response team
  • Child in Need- social care became involved. Meeting and reports completed
  • Home visit for safety in the home issues. Your homes contacted about windows.
  • Emails shared with professional regarding debt management. Support given to mum after advice. A payment plan set up and home- eviction no longer hanging over the family.
  • Debt management concerning daughter’s rent payments. Direct debits set up between them both. Advice given for daughter to leave (at present she has gone) due to complaints about verbal abuse to Child A.
  • TA delivers 1:1 sessions with Child A about relationships and safety. SENCO plan and evaluate child A’s sessions weekly.
  • Child A’s family kept their home.
  • Relationships in the house have improved – observations and 1:1 work, Child A confirms things ‘are happier’.
  • Family will continue with Social Care support- possible intervention worker for mum.

 

Pupil B (male, Early Years)

Pupil C (male,

KS1)

 

  • A Key Worker was put in place for pupil B and Thrive assessments carried out, planned for and delivered. Evaluated each term. Liaised with Thrive Lead at another Trust school.
  • SENCO met with Thrive team and had fortnightly telephone conversations with Thrive lead.
  • Pupil C was referred for counselling after review meetings
  • SENCO went on home visit for Social Care action team.
  • SENCO attended CAF meetings
  • Monitoring put in place for Pupil B regarding soiling issues. GP letter and Paediatrician letter to support request for help.
  • Child B progressed from 16 months to 36 months in his developmental matters assessment for PSED
  • Social care had no further action due to our support in school
  • From GP appointment and recent Paediatrician appointment a CYPS referral is required. Early Intervention for Child B’s needs.
  • Child C has responded well to counselling openly talking about home and his feelings.
  • Child C has met ARE in all subjects for Y1 and has made expected progress this year.
 

Extend the school day to ensure optimum learning

  • Offer all extra-curricular clubs free
  • This involves pay for external coaches/ drama leads and so on and also overtime for support staff.

 

£3060

  • In Reception there are 15 children who attend after school clubs and 6 of these children are disadvantaged. Out of these 6 children 4 of them achieved Good Level of Development (GLD) at the end of Reception. Of the two children that did not, one was a late admit (April 2016). 67% of disadvantaged children who attend clubs in Reception achieved GLD compared to 63% who are disadvantaged and do not attend clubs.
  • The uptake of clubs in Year 2 is very high with 13 out of 16 Disadvantaged children attending at least 1 club.
  • In Year 3 all of the disadvantaged children attend at least 1 club.
  • The only Year groups where disadvantaged children not attending clubs performed better was in Year 5 and Year 6 in numeracy but the cohort numbers in both classes are quite small. Only 3 disadvantaged children in Year 5 and 2 disadvantaged children in Year 6 didn’t attend any clubs.
  • Participation in clubs seems to make a significant difference in the attainment of our children, particularly in KS1. For example in Y2, 77% of disadvantaged children who attend clubs met the required standard at the end of KS1 compared to 33% of children who didn’t. This is a difference of 44%.
  • No disadvantaged children in Y2 or Y4 who did not attend clubs met the required standard for writing in their year group.
  • The range of clubs with the practical and engaging activities have made a significant difference in those children achieving ARE.
  • Clubs have increased pupils enjoyment at school and have raised self-esteem, confidence and a readiness for learning.

 

 

Maths % at ARE

Reading % at ARE

Writing % at ARE

Pupil Prem   pupils

Attend clubs

Did not Attend clubs

Attend clubs

Did not Attend clubs

Attend clubs

Did not Attend clubs

Y1

75%

40%

83%

50%

50%

20%

Y2

69%

33%

77%

33%

46%

0%

Y3

40%

NA

60%

NA

47%

NA

Y4

73%

33%

45%

17%

45%

0%

Y5

60%

100%

80%

33%

70%

33%

Y6

78%

100%

78%

67%

78%

67%

Expose children to culture rich experiences

  • Visits and experiences will be planned specifically to enrich children’s experiences (trips are heavily subsidised for disadvantaged children)
  • Christmas pantomime (heavily subsidised specifically for disadvantaged children)
  • Whole school Author week including: All children to take home a copy of the book studied that week and an author working in each class

£1200

  • Such experiences have impacted positively on children’s individual learning across the curriculum. For example, to bring the experience of a Rainforest to life children in Year 3/4 were able to visit the Sunderland Winter Gardens where they could see plants that grow in a rainforest environment and experience the humidity needed for plants to grow. Children were then able to draw on these experiences when writing descriptions of the Rainforest and writing about what equipment they would need to pack to visit the Rainforest and why.
  • Table of school trips during 2015-2016

 

Rec

ARC

Y1

Y2

Y3

Y4

Y5

Y6

*Fenwicks Window

*Pets at Home

*Baltic Museum

 

*Fire station

* Ice skating

*Safety Works

*Castle Keep

*Alnwick Castle

*Cinema

* Gosforth Fire Station

*Alnwick Castle

*Tynemouth Priory

*St Mary’s Church

* Gosforth Fire Station

*Alnwick Castle

*Tynemouth Priory

*St Mary’s Church

*Shelter building at Plessey Woods

*Stone Age to Iron Age workshop Great North Museum

*Newcastle Christmas Market

*Sunderland Winter Gardens

*St Mary’s Church

*Shelter building at Plessey Woods

*Stone Age to Iron Age workshop Great North Museum

*Newcastle Christmas Market

*Sunderland Winter Gardens

*St Mary’s Church

*Great North Museum

*St Mary’s Church

*Laing Art Gallery

 

*Virgin Money

*Granger Market

*City Hall

*Great North Museum

*St Mary’s Church

*Hawkhirst

*Kirby Hall

Specifically target disadvantaged children with extra support in their learning

 

  • Experienced advisor to lead on quality first teaching

COST:£45000

 

 

  • Extra teacher in Upper Key Stage 2 for support and intervention.

COST:£25000

 

 

 

  • Extra support staff in Year 2.

COST:£12750

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intended Impact

Impact

Improved percentage of disadvantaged children with SEN achieving age related expectations

  • There has been an improvement for disadvantaged SEN children achieving age related expectations. In Year 6, 4 out of 6 SEN children achieved ARE in Maths, Reading, Writing and SPAG.  Only one of these pupils was working at ARE at the end of KS1.  Another one of these pupils was working at a level 1and she has converted to ARE (at the End of Year 5 she was working at Stage 3 so has made accelerated progress).   The two pupils who did not get ARE were working at level 1 at KS1 and have significant needs.  This has gone from 17% to being at ARE in KS1 to 67% at the end of KS2. 

 

  • In Year 2 having extra support staff meant they were able to have target groups of disadvantaged SEN children.     In numeracy, 4 out of 6 children who were in an intervention were able to make the required standard.  In reading 3 out of the 4 disadvantaged SEN children were able to make required standards. 
  • In Year 2, we have doubled the number of disadvantaged SEN children who make ARE expectations in Reading and Numeracy since their Early Years data. Writing is still a little way behind but as children’s reading improves we expect to see the impact on writing  

 

% of DIS SEN making ARE

Reading

Writing

Numeracy

Early Years

(2014)

38% (3)

25% (2)

25% (2)

Year 2

2016

75% (6)

38% (3)

50% (4)

To promote learning through play and specifically to improve language and communication skills.

 

  • The Reception class teacher has led whole school Staff meeting on language after good practice was identified in a lesson observation.    
  • This year our disadvantaged children in Reception were just as likely to achieve a Good Level of Development regardless if they are Disadvantaged or not.   64% of our disadvantaged children and 65% of non-disadvantaged children received GLD at the end of Reception.
  • The children that did not achieve GLD in Reception was due to other significant barriers to their learning which has had an impact on their progress. Our disadvantaged children have done well and at times have exceeded the non-disadvantaged children. For example in reading, we have four disadvantaged pupils exceeding at reading compared to one non-disadvantaged pupil.
  • Table below shows the breakdown of barriers to learning for those children who did not make GLD at the end of Reception.  

Disadvantaged Not Achieving GLD

Not Disadvantaged Not Achieving GLD

Child 1 – SEN, Dis, Summer birthday

Child 1- SEN, summer born

Child 2 - SEN, Dis, EAL, Summer birthday

Child 2- EAL

Child 3 - SEN, DIS

 

Child 3 - Summer born

Child 4 - Dis new admit Nov 2015, SC concerns

 

Child 4 - New admit 25th April 2016 (family have been travelling the children will also not be with us in September as they are moving school again.

Child 5 - Dis new admit 12th April 2016 (no Reception year until arriving at our school)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To ensure any child below Age Related Expectations make accelerated progress and catches up at the earliest opportunity

 

  • Early interventions for children at risk of regressing or making less than expected progress were put in place.     For example, the experienced advisor worked with one of our Y6 disadvantaged pupils who due to his SEN needs found it difficult to participate in whole class writing lessons.  She worked alongside in class and completed some 1:1 sessions with this child and he was able to achieve ARE for writing. 
  • In KS1 eleven disadvantaged pupils out of sixteen made the required standard in reading. Four of these pupils were emerging pupils at the end of Reception for reading, so they have made more than expected progress.  Another pupil who achieved expected levels in Reading in Reception has now exceeded levels in Year 2, again showing better than expected progress. 
  • In KS1 six disadvantaged pupils out of sixteen made the required standard in writing. Two of these pupils were emerging pupils at the end of Reception for writing so they have made more than expected progress.  Another pupil who achieved expected levels in writing in Reception has now exceeded levels in Year 2, again showing better than expected progress. 
  • In KS1 ten disadvantaged pupils out of sixteen made the required standard in maths. Three of these pupils were emerging pupils at the end of Reception for maths so they have made more than expected progress. Two pupils who achieved expected levels in maths in Reception have now exceeded levels in Year 2, again showing better than expected progress. 
  • In KS2 out of twelve pupils, nine met the required standard in reading. Three of these children were not working at ARE at the end of KS1. Three children were working at ARE at KS1 and by year 6 were judged by teacher assessment (TA) to be exceeding the required standard.  One of these pupils was working at level 1 at the end of KS1. All of the disadvantaged children working at 2A or above in KS1 were assessed by their teacher to be working at exceeding the required standard in KS2. 
  • In writing in KS1, there were only two disadvantaged pupils out of the twelve who were working at ARE for writing.     By the end of KS2 nine of these pupils are now working at ARE which is exceeding progress.   One of these pupils was working at level 1 at the end of KS1.
  • In numeracy at KS1 just five out of the 12 disadvantaged children were working at ARE. At the end of KS2 ten out of the twelve children were now working at ARE.  One of these pupils was working at level 1 at the end of KS1.

 Table above showing comparison between KS1 and Y6 disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged pupils end of Key Stage results.

 

 

KS1

Y6

 

Maths

Reading

Writing

Maths

Reading

Writing

 

DIS (16)

NON

(6)

DIS

(16)

NON

(6)

DIS

(16)

NON

(6)

DIS

(12)

NON

(3)

DIS

(12)

NON

(3)

DIS

(12)

NON

(3)

Below

38% (6)

17% (1)

31% (5)

33% (2)

63% (10)

50% (3)

17% (2)

0

23% (3)

0

23% (3)

0

Expected

50% (8)

33% (2)

63% (10)

33% (2)

31% (5)

17% (1)

83% (10)

100% (3)

75% (9)

100% (3)

75% (9)

67% (2)

 

 

Support families to meet their children’s needs

  • Taxis (where appropriate) for families to and from CYPS and other necessary

appointments

  • Release time for staff to accompanying parents where necessary on specific appointments

£3200

 Specifically in complex cases where there is key information from school to be shared it has proved beneficial to support parents at these meetings.

  • Members of staff have been released when necessary to attend appointments with families.
  • A reduction in the numbers of appointments missed ensuring that children get maximum support from CYPS appropriate to their needs.
  • Head Teacher has attended two school visits supporting ARC pupils transitioning to an alternative education provision.
  • Staff have attended ten different CYPS appointments this year as well as accompanying parents to two doctors’ appointments.

 

Maximise every opportunity to support parents to read with their children

  • Regularly update the reading library in breakfast club with books that will entice children and their parents.

 

£600

  • This Year 65% of our disadvantaged Reception children achieved expected or better levels for reading which is1% better than our non-disadvantaged children.  We also had four disadvantaged children exceeding for reading compared to just one non-disadvantaged child. This is the first time our disadvantaged children have performed in line or better than our non-disadvantaged children.
  • In Year 2 our disadvantaged children have also achieved in line with our non- disadvantaged children.   69% of our disadvantaged children met the required standard for the end of KS1 compared to 66% non-disadvantaged.         Of the five disadvantaged children who did not achieve the required standard, two of the children did not sit the SATs test because they were not working at Stage 2.         Two of the children were also SEN and one is also EAL. The fifth child who did not make the expected level is also EAL.
  • In Year 6, 75% of our disadvantaged children met the required standard in reading. In Year 6, there are just two disadvantaged boys with significant SEN needs who were not able to make expected levels. Another disadvantaged child who did not make expected levels for reading and writing was EAL who was admitted to school on 22nd February 2016 after not being in the UK since the end of Year 2.
  • 68% of our disadvantaged pupils passed the phonics screening check (this is 50% when our ARC children are included). This is an increase of 8% compared to 2015 when 60% of our disadvantaged children passed their phonics screening test.
  • In 2015 the government reported that there was a 15% difference between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged in the phonics screening check. Based on 2015 data of a 77% pass then our gap is less than the national average at 9%. If the national pass mark increases this year again by 3% and the gap between the disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged decrease by 1% again then we would still be less than the national average.
  • Our Year 1 cohort has made significant progress since the end of Reception when just 47% achieved expected/exceeding levels in reading. At the end of Y1 we have 68% passing their phonics check and 68% now at ARE for reading. This is an increase of 21%.

Ensure Disadvantaged children access as much learning as possible

  • Purchase of a large selection of books available as incentives for children with high attendance.
  • Mini attendance initiatives throughout the year and end of year trip for 100% for the whole year.
  • Purchase of high quality engaging texts to maximise learning and promote reading for pleasure through updating the school library and reading areas in each classroom.

£12000

  • Attainment and progress has been good across the school with the gaps closing towards ARE for reading.
  • Reading attainment of PP children of Early Years currently 65% good levels of development or above (the same data in 2015 was 47% so this is an increase of 21%)
  • Reading attainment of PP children in Y1 being at ARE is 68% (increase since Reception of 21%)
  • Reading attainment of PP children in Y2 being at ARE is 69% (increase since Reception of 25%)
  • Reading attainment of PP children in Y6 being at ARE is 75% (increase since KS1 of +33%)
  • Attendance bookshop has been running this year offering book rewards as incentives for attendance. Each full week attended gives one point. When a child reaches 10 points they can choose a book from the bookshop.   As a review of the system and to gain maximum impact from next year class teachers will be monitoring this on a weekly basis with a class display so the children can see their points increasing each week.        
  • Funding a School Counsellor

 

 

 

 

 

£5240

  • 14 children have attended counselling sessions this year.         All of these children are disadvantaged.
  • 8 out of the 14 children are also on the SEN register.
  • 10 of these children (71%) have made ARE of better in at least 1 or more subjects (maths, reading, writing).
  • 10 of these children (71%) have also made expected or better progress in at least 1 or more subjects.
  • Some pupils have made very good progress for example, Child N in Year 5 was working below the required for reading and writing but achieved the required standard in Year 6.
  • The table below shows the attainment and progress of children who receive counselling.  

 

% of children receiving counselling making ARE in 3 subjects

% of children receiving counselling making ARE in 2 subjects or more

% of children receiving counselling making ARE in 1 subject or more

% of children receiving counselling exceeding expected progress in 1 or more subjects

% of children receiving counselling making expected progress in 1 or more subjects

% of children receiving counselling making expected or better progress in 3 subjects

36%

(5 children)

57%

(8 children)

71%

(10 children)

43%

(6children)

71%

(10 children)

50%

(7 children)

 

  • The table below gives a breakdown of disadvantaged children in North Fawdon who receive counselling.

 

Child

Attainment

Progress

Other

Child A (male

KS1)

 

Has made ARE in reading, writing and maths.

Child A has made expected progress this year.

Child A was extremely withdrawn and aggressive towards younger sibling. He now plays confidently with other children and is kind to other children.

Child B (male

KS1 SEN register)

 

Has made ARE in reading and maths.

Child B has made more than expected progress in reading and maths and expected progress in writing.

Child B has high anxiety issues. During the course of the year his circumstances at home have changed and he is now a LAC child. Sessions have been extremely disturbed as a consequence of this but will continue next year.

Child C (male LOWER KS2 SEN register)

 

Has made ARE in reading and writing.

Has made expected progress this year.

Child C really struggled with his own identify and fitting in and making friendships with other children. Although he still faces challenges when working with other children he is now much more confident now. He verbalises this by saying, ‘You were right, it’s good to be me now.’ He also said to his TA that, ‘all his worries disappeared,’ after having his sessions.

Child D (female LOWER KS2 SEN register)

 

Is working below ARE in all subjects.

Has made expected progress with her writing and maths.

Has not made expected progress with her reading.

Due to parents withdrawing consent, work was not completed. Slight improvements with relationships and behaviour

Child E

(Male LOWER KS2 SEN register)

Is working below ARE in all subjects.

Has not made expected progress in all subjects.

New admit January 2016 returning home after previously being a LAC child. Extreme anger. Improved relationships at home. Mum noticed a huge changed and does not have any concerns about him anymore.

Child F

(Female LOWER KS2 SEN register)

 

Has made ARE in maths but not in reading and writing.

Child F has made more than expected progress in writing, reading and maths.

Child F was referred for anxiety, behaviour and social skills. Improvements in some areas. A lot of work done around relationships and abandonment with regards to family. Referral to CYPS.

Child G

(Female LOWER KS2)

 

Has made ARE in maths but is working below in reading and writing.

Has made more than expected progress in writing and maths but below expected progress in reading since KS1.

New admit January 2016 returning home after previously being a LAC child. Child G is in early stages of counselling, anxiety at home, lack of sleep etc. Slight improvements with regards to secure attachment with parent. Improved confidence.

Child H

(Male LOWER KS2 SEN register)

Is working below ARE in all subjects.

Has made less than expected progress in all subjects.

Child H is in early stages of counselling. Referred for behaviour. Has been very challenging, CAF to be opened. CYPS DR would like to be involved, possible family intensive support as an option.

Child I

(Female UPPER KS2 SEN register)

 

Is working below ARE in maths, reading and writing.

Has made less than expected progress in maths, reading and writing.

Child I was referred for low mood and lack of confidence. There have been huge improvements with Child I. Unfortunately due to family circumstances, she has begun to withdraw again - work will continue next year.

Child J

(Male UPPER KS2)

 

Is working at ARE for maths, reading and writing.

Has made expected progress in maths and more than expected progress in writing, but less than expected progress in reading

Child J was referred for low confidence. He has worked on improving self-esteem. Child J is now a lot more confident and actually said 'I feel normal again - it's great'

Child K

(Female UPPER KS2)

 

Is working at ARE for reading and writing but below for maths.

Is making more than expected progress for reading, writing and maths.

Child K has participated in group work

Child L

(UPPER KS2)

 

 

Is working at ARE for maths, reading and writing.

Is making less than expected progress for reading, writing and maths.

Child K has participated in group work

Child M

(Male UPPER KS2)

 

Is working at ARE for all subjects

Has made more than expected progress in writing and has made expected progress in numeracy and reading

Child M was exhibiting extreme anger towards siblings. He has worked a lot on anger management; huge improvements noticed at home however attendance seriously reduced over the academic year. Child M never missed a session and would always be in on a Thursday. The session was swapped to a Monday to encourage him into school and again he began coming in every Monday. He started an attendance chart which worked initially but attendance soon started to drop again.

Child N

(Male UPPER KS2 SEN register)

 

Is working at ARE for all subjects

Has made expected progress in numeracy, reading and writing.    

Child N has an ASD diagnosis and has had brief counselling. Improved social skills and temperament